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Young men at our shrine who just got initiated into Fa(Ifa), the Yoruba-origin geomantic divination system and deity of wisdom.

There is a worrying trend of people reading textbooks or Google-searching rituals in African spirituality and claiming to be legitimate practitioners or, in the worst-case, priests. This article will expand on why self-initiation after reading books is unlikely to be effective and sometimes even dangerous. While books and theoretical research can offer valuable insights on African spiritual traditions, they can never substitute a physical initiation by an experienced elder or practitioner.

Unlike prevalent religions such as Christianity and Islam, African spiritual and herbal traditions such as Vodu, Fa (Ifa), Isese, Santeria, Palo, etc., are not religious practices where practitioners need…


“Blood is like a battery that empowers spirits and ancestors before they work”-Christopher Voncujovi, Ewe Vodu Priest in Accra, Ghana.

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Many African spiritual practices utilize blood sacrifice to feed deities and ancestors.

In many African spiritual practices like my practice of Vodu, blood sacrifice is a common practice. Vodu practitioners beleive that sacrifice to deities and ancestors are necessary for the progress of an individual. Even though killing an animal is inevitable, this practice includes being mindful and appreciative of those sacrificed.

Here are three reasons why we do blood sacrifice in sacrifice African spirituality.

  1. Blood acts like a battery that empowers spirits and ancestors to work.

Most African deities require blood…


As a third-generation practitioner of West African Ewe Vodu, I have encountered hundreds of practitioners and priests in my life. Here I share three tips on how to separate the good ones from the bad ones.

  1. Legitimate priests do not go around looking for clients, clients find them. Legitimate priests usually get new clients from referrals from past clients. If a priest starts messaging you on social media with stories of how your ancestors or spirit guides spoke to him/her, they are more likely that not a fake. Do not fall for their tricks.
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Masquerades in traditional regalia during the Vodun Festival in Benin.

“What can these backward practices do for Africa? “

“Can it even contribute to the economy?”

These are comments by some who want to discredit African spirituality, like my practice of Vodu. Let me, therefore, break down how African spirituality and its concomitant herbal practices have politically, economically, and socially impacted Africa and the larger African Diaspora.

Politically and historically, many traditional practitioners inspired or directly fought for the freedom of the black man. For example, the Haitian Revolution, which led to the first free black nation in the Western Hemisphere, was led by a Vodu priest, Dutty Bukman, in…


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A recent commenter came onto our page, ReVodution: Voodoo Education, criticizing African spirituality, specifically my practice of Vodu, as being “unclean” saying:

“When you have a tradition like this that looks unhealthy or unhygienic you don’t expect people to practice. You post pics of shrines that looks unsightly or for lack of better word “nasty”. ”

It is clear that this person does not know much about Vodu practice to hold such view. Let me share share three reasons why I don’t think African spiritual practices or Vodu is unclean based on my experience as a third-generation Vodu priest.

Firstly…


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With the global COVID-19 pandemic showing no signs of stopping and with China being the genesis of the Virus, why would anyone want to go to China this year? Indeed, many have questioned my decision to study in China this year. Apart from the Coronavirus, Sinophobia has been on the rise globally, spearheaded by the Trump Administration. As a West African Vodu herbal and spiritual practitioner with a background in international politics and economics, I want to study China’s Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) industry, and learn about China’s past, present, and future as it relates to Africa. …


Past Is Prologue

From white colonizers to contemporary pop culture

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A picture of a White Jesus defeating a dark-skinned Satan. Such depictions, including the iconography in this calendar photo, are very common in contemporary West Africa.

“You must stop your Satanic idol-worship.”

“You devil worshipper.”

“You will go to Hell.”

These are all common comments said to me as a third-generation practitioner of Vodu, an ancient West African spiritual and herbal practice. Mostly these things are said by Christians preaching their faith on me.

I used to react harshly, which normally ended in an argument or insults. As I grew older, I realized that most people have little knowledge of African history or spiritual traditions. …


“Until the Lion learns to tell its story, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter”-An African Proverb

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Sena Voncujovi

Afro-Asian Pan-African| West African Vodu herbal and spiritual practitioner | Founder of ReVodution & Jaspora (Japan Africa Diaspora)| PKU China Studies Scholar

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